thebooksmith:

Tana French is better than ever in the new one, by the way (also out today). 

The teenagers’ affected idiocy, and an argot for which Ms. French blames American reality TV shows, may not make this the most inviting milieu for those who like the sheer Irishness of her other novels. The international lingo of texting and teenage movies (“Um, duh?”) provides the police with an extra, nerve-racking challenge. But part of this book’s trickiness is its way of letting characters hide the truth behind the smoke screen of language and let both readers and investigators gradually figure out who is lying.

It’s out today! Yippee skippee!

(Reblogged from thebooksmith)

lauren-oliver:

I am the most excited person in the world!

Little Olives, I had so much fun today hanging out with all of you who showed up at BEA. My apologies to everyone that I ran out of books! Don’t forget, I’ll be there tomorrow signing for Panic at 10:30am at table 12!

Nothin’ to see here just browsin’ the “Lauren Oliver” tag on tumblr and coming across this adorable photo of the author.

(Reblogged from lauren-oliver)
(Reblogged from cmclibraryteen)

Q&A with Charles Todd

crimespreemagazine:

Q&A with Charles Todd

An Unwilling Accomplice by Charles Toddis a great read. Not only does it have a riveting mysterious plot but it also has details about English society during the World War I period. Since this month marks the 100th anniversary of the war people might want to read this book to immerse themselves in that era. The plot has Bess along with her good family friend Simon setting out to solve the…

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Yo, this is a great book to read this year, as World War I plays a major role and it’s the 100 year anniversary!

(Reblogged from crimespreemagazine)

I think Pierce maybe doesn’t even realize just how autobiographical a lot of Red Rising is,” Brown’s editor Braff tells me over the phone. “I’ve read that book now, I can’t tell you how many times, edited it several times over. I’m so far into book two, and so far into the characters, that I’m really deep into Pierce’s psyche now. I think that in many ways, he is Darrow. In many ways he’s a guy who rose up from modest to extraordinary means and feels a kinship — ah, this is going to sound corny as hell — but a kinship with people who are social outcasts in one way or another. I think that he’s a person who is deep into two different worlds, and that makes him fascinating and it makes his characters fascinating.

Really enjoying this piece about a LibraryReads favorite, Pierce Brown!
(via Why Pierce Brown Might Be Fiction’s Next Superstar)

I think Pierce maybe doesn’t even realize just how autobiographical a lot of Red Rising is,” Brown’s editor Braff tells me over the phone. “I’ve read that book now, I can’t tell you how many times, edited it several times over. I’m so far into book two, and so far into the characters, that I’m really deep into Pierce’s psyche now. I think that in many ways, he is Darrow. In many ways he’s a guy who rose up from modest to extraordinary means and feels a kinship — ah, this is going to sound corny as hell — but a kinship with people who are social outcasts in one way or another. I think that he’s a person who is deep into two different worlds, and that makes him fascinating and it makes his characters fascinating.

Really enjoying this piece about a LibraryReads favorite, Pierce Brown!

(via Why Pierce Brown Might Be Fiction’s Next Superstar)

the-library-kat:

librarianinthebuff:

This little girl at the library wrote me this card. If I ever make it big in the library world and get an office to myself I’m framing this and putting this on my wall.

Notes like these are the best thing about being a librarian.

I think you should frame it and put it on whatever wall is near you, even if it’s your bathroom wall.

(Reblogged from libraryadvocates)

rachelfershleiser:

This is what it looks like when you are taking a BookSelfie with Station Eleven by Emily St. John Mandel (!!!) and Amber (rightfully) runs over to yell at you because she is your official photographer and what are you doing, and then you crack up and look evil/wolf-like.

Point being, I have heard nothing but enormously wonderful things about this book and I can’t wait to read it.

It’s on our September list, so we will just add to that noise of enormously wonderful things. Enjoy!

(Reblogged from rachelfershleiser)

Doughty, Caitlin. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory. Norton. Sept. 2014. 256p. notes. ISBN 9780393240238. $24.95; ebk. ISBN 9780393245950.
When Doughty graduated college with a degree in medieval history, potential employers weren’t exactly knocking down her door. To indulge a morbid curiosity, she applied to jobs at funeral homes until the family-owned mortuary Westwind Cremation & Burial in Oakland, CA, hired her as a crematory operator. Her memoir documents her first six years working in the American funeral industry. Doughty blows the lid off of what happens after life leaves a body, pulling back the formaldehyde curtain. In a narrative that’s not for the faint of heart, she describes the process of cremating a body, shaving a corpse, and, even more horrifying, picking up stillbirths from the hospital. But by including stories on how different societies have dealt with death throughout history, she takes readers on a comprehensive journey that is not only thought provoking but also a call to arms. The author argues that our collective fear of dying makes it difficult to face life’s reality. VERDICT Even though Doughty’s memoir is difficult to stomach at times, it is well researched, candid, and will inspire a careful consideration of one’s own mortality. [See Prepub Alert, 3/31/14.](via Books To Make Your Stomach Churn | Memoir)

Librarians love this book so much it was the top pick for September and also garnered a starred review in Library Journal. 

Doughty, Caitlin. Smoke Gets in Your Eyes: And Other Lessons from the Crematory. Norton. Sept. 2014. 256p. notes. ISBN 9780393240238. $24.95; ebk. ISBN 9780393245950.

When Doughty graduated college with a degree in medieval history, potential employers weren’t exactly knocking down her door. To indulge a morbid curiosity, she applied to jobs at funeral homes until the family-owned mortuary Westwind Cremation & Burial in Oakland, CA, hired her as a crematory operator. Her memoir documents her first six years working in the American funeral industry. Doughty blows the lid off of what happens after life leaves a body, pulling back the formaldehyde curtain. In a narrative that’s not for the faint of heart, she describes the process of cremating a body, shaving a corpse, and, even more horrifying, picking up stillbirths from the hospital. But by including stories on how different societies have dealt with death throughout history, she takes readers on a comprehensive journey that is not only thought provoking but also a call to arms. The author argues that our collective fear of dying makes it difficult to face life’s reality. VERDICT Even though Doughty’s memoir is difficult to stomach at times, it is well researched, candid, and will inspire a careful consideration of one’s own mortality. [See Prepub Alert, 3/31/14.](via Books To Make Your Stomach Churn | Memoir)

Librarians love this book so much it was the top pick for September and also garnered a starred review in Library Journal

fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers:

Caitlin Doughty

Caitlin Doughty has a really informative and funny web series called Ask a Mortician. I highly recommend you check it out.

(Reblogged from fuckyeahfemaleyoutubers)

It’s here! The September 2014 LibraryReads list

This month there are witches, crematoriums, a haunted furniture store, traveling, courts, and so much more. Even if you love summer, there are plenty of things to be excited about this fall.